A Werewolf Playlist–Kickass tunes from SGJ

Not what I listened to while Mongrels-writing, but some songs that synch up well with Mongrels, I think. Which you can cue up just on Spotify, here*. Also, before I get to annotating and embedding and pulling my hair about because the versions I want aren’t available, etc, I also put together a Youtube playlist—different stuff, same vein—here* (also, no guarantees there isn’t a bit of overlap between Youtube and Spotify—I get really clicky about werewolf songs). So, take my paw, let me lead you into this full-moon night—really, a certain someone says it all better than I can: And here we go: 1. Five Man Electrical Band The natural life cycle of the American werewolf 2. Townes Van Zandt All werewolf statements start with some version of “If I had a dollar bill” 3. The Gourds Everybody goes to jail at some point. Especially werewolves. 4. Melissa Etheridge When it comes down to being sentimental or being alive, werewolves always pick being alive. 5. Mulehead Werewolf cars eat up the miles. Seven states in fourteen hours? Only if you stop at every last roadside attraction. 6. Tom Waits It’s pretty obvious Tom Waits is a werewolf. 7. Sun Kil Moon Werewolves, they know about burning the trash, and, much like this band, they never win any spelling bees either 8. The Dollyrots This particular werewolf’s name, it’s Layla 9. Dr. John Werewolves don’t want to know about evil. They just want to know about love. 10. Drive-By Truckers I know a werewolf who talks  . . . → → →

Source: A Werewolf Playlist

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Motel Hell (1980) Review

One of my faves that I saw in the theater…

Rare Horror

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Some horror movies you watch for the fear factor, some for the gore. And then there are the ones you watch because they’re just so damn fun.

Motel Hell is one of those movies. This is a wildly nutty, unapologetic romp that may make you think twice before wolfing down that sausage patty.

Farmer Vincent (Rory  Calhoun) and his sister Ida (Nancy Parsons) run the Motel Hello located in a quaint little rural town. People come from miles around for the hospitality, but mainly for Vincent’s delicious home-smoked meats, which are the best meats around. But those meats are made with a special ingredient, and it ain’t just love. It comes from Farmer Vincent’s secret garden out back – and it’s what’s in the garden that makes his meat so goshdarn good. Because as Vincent himself says “It takes all kinds of critters to make Farmer Vincent’s fritters”.

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Motel Hell…

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Gallery

Issue 18.1 has Launched!

Lots of wow right here.

RED INK

Issue 18.1 is now available in print! The newest issue was officially released last week at a gala and presentation by Sherman Alexie at Arizona State University in Tempe. Purchase the issue now and finish reading Alexie’s interview with Critical Essays Editor Travis Franks, alongside:

poetry by Michael Wasson, LeAnne Howe, Tacey M. Atsitty, Anna Osceola, Lois J. Red Elk-Reed, Shauna Osborn, Crisosto Apache, Trevino Brings Plenty,Sara Marie Ortiz, Daniel Becker, Karenne Wood, Velma Kee Craig, KT Omonomonee, Kyle Grant Wilson, Millissa Millie Kingbird, and Truman Peyote

fiction and drama by Jaisey Bates, Jimmy Lee Beason II,  and Natanya Ann Pulley

nonfiction by Diane Glancy, Beverly Singer,  Elizabeth Archuleta

art by Kathy Whitman-Elk Woman, Cannupa Hanska Luger, and Stephanie Allen

We’d like to offer a special thanks to our dedicated staff, and to the crew at JC…

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Quick Note — It’s Official Release Day

Just a quick note–it’s Official Release Day for The Faster Redder Road: The Best UnAmerican Stories of Stephen Graham Jones! 22% off today!

So yeah, that was it. Thanks so much for all your support. Oh. This is what they’re saying:

“This collection showcases the best writings of Stephen Graham Jones, whose career is developing rapidly from the noir underground to the mainstream. The Faster Redder Roadfeatures excerpts from Jones’s novels–including The Last Final GirlThe Fast Red Road: A PlainsongNot for Nothing, and The Gospel of Z–and short stories, some never before published in book form. Examining Jones’s contributions to American literature as well as noir, Theodore C. Van Alst Jr.’s introduction puts Jones on the literary map.”

and

“Stephen Graham Jones does for the literary world what Andy Warhol did for the visual arts: turns the common into the extraordinary, makes the low high, and absolves the sins of our literary pleasures. Like a madman in a factory, Jones produces one terrifying masterpiece after another–he is a superstar, and his brilliance will burn way longer than anyone’s fifteen minutes of fame.”–Ito Romo, author of The Border Is Burning